TV Review: In its third season, Black Mirror finds its most shocking twist: Hope

The speculative anthology Black Mirror has always been curious (and anxious) about the intersection of technology and perception, finding inspiration in the many ways the march of electronic progress blinds and binds its participants. As the British import returns to augment our reality for a third time—and first for thematically appropriate Silicon Valley behemoth Netflix—it expresses a renewed interest in the disconnects of the connected world. In these six episodes, characters poke at digital projections, are immersed in elaborate simulations, and answer online sins with IRL consequences. They can see these “layers on top of reality” (in the words of the gaming-centric “Playtest”), but they yearn for tactile feedback as well.

And so does Black Mirror. A series of standalone stories set in various dystopian futures risks alienating its viewers as readily as it terrifies them. It needs to provide reasons to care about the fictional people being …

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *